Environmental Photography: 7 Photographers Changing the World

Environmental photography dramatically exposes environmental issues as nothing else. Today’s blog post is all about environmental and social photography, showcasing some of the most ambitious projects featured worldwide. If you’re an amateur or professional photographer, get inspired by these seven photographers who are changing the world with their breathtaking photos. Perhaps you can make a difference, too. Here’s a look:
1. Alejandro Durán - Mexico
Cepillos 005   Sian Ka’an abounds with fauna and flora as it’s home to the second largest coastal barrier reef in the world. Unfortunately, this paradise has become a depository for the world’s trash, which is carried by currents from several parts of the world. That’s absolutely dreadful, isn’t it? As you can see, even land that has not been developed can’t avoid the huge impact of our culture. With this campaign, the photographer tried to raise awareness to try and make us change our behavior now. This clever photo in particular by Duran shows how trash has taken over our once-beautiful sites. It is an inspiration to anyone with an interest in environmental conservation.
2. Gary Braasch – United States
Peru climate change issues 2014 Gary Braasch visited a weaving community in the Andes right above the Urubamba River close to Cusco 13,000 feet up in the mountains. The village of Accha Alta has gone back to the very traditional patterns and dyes used in the past when weaving the finest wool of Peru, despite more modern options being available in the cities, thanks to the vision and intervention of the local artisans, who wish to preserve their culture. Their area is threatened ‘though, Peruvians living there are seeing less snow and other climate changes due to a melting glacier in the Andes, their wool confections and leaving means are aso under threat. The photographer wishes to bring attention to the environmental impact climate change already has on real communities.
3.  Steve Morgan – United Kingdom
env3 This Gemasolar thermosolar power plant in Fuentes de Andalucía, Seville, Spain, features state-of-the-art technology to create electricity.A circular solar field which features 2,650 heliostat mirrors throughout 185 hectares converges energy from the sun towards the central receiving tower, where the highly intense heat created is accumulated by using a cutting-edge storage technology. The heat which is gathered by the salts, able to reach temperatures over 5,000C, produces steam and generates electricity. The surplus heat which is collected is kept in the molten-salt tank, enabling Gemasolar to generate power 24/7 for many months each year. Solar efficiency ensures the production of electricity for 6,500 hours per year. This useful plant, beautifully photographed by Steve Morgan, provides power to about 25,000 homes, reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 30,000 tonnes a year, proving that green is possible.
4. Francesca Moore – United Kingdom
env4 Many years ago, gas was leaked, exposing half a million people to toxic substances and chemicals at a pesticide plant in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India.A government affidavit announced that this leak which took place in 1984 caused 558,125 horrible injuries, including over 8,000 deaths, 38,478 temporary injuries as well as 3,900 permanently disabling injuries. With this outstanding project, Francesca Moore wanted to portray the people who have been affected by this terrible disaster in one way or another. From left to right, the people who are photographed are Rafiq Uddin with his spouse Saiva Bi and their daughter Saiba Jhan. You can also see their sons Rehan Uddin, Avhan Uddin and Faizan Uddin sitting on the floor. 5. Prasanta Biswas - India env5 Facing regular shortages of water day in and day out, the people who live in in Sundarban, West Bengal, India, truly moved the photographer, Prasanta Biswas. Since the climate has changed day by day, there have been radical physical effects on the tropical climate such as floods, droughts, cyclones, increased salinity, increased temperature as well as increased precipitation. Sadly, this is what Sundarban residents have to cope with on a daily basis. We can do something about it and Prasanta wants to remind us why we should with these powerful images.
6. Matilda Temperley – United Kingdom
env6 Matilda Temperley was also moved by the residents’ homes who were flooded on the Somerset Levels at Burrowbridge. Unfortunately, when the neighboring River Parrett burst its banks, numerous homeowners in the rural areas of Muchelney, Thorney and Burrowbridge in Somerset were devastated with up to four feet of water in January 2014.
7. Antonio Busiello – Italy
env7 This project is called Camp of Shame.Antonio Busiello explained that he had been taking photographs of the waste crisis in Campania, south of Italy for a year or so. Sadly, these people are living in an area known as Aria vasta Giuliana, a highly polluted piece of land between two confiscated and toxic dumps. An ex-Mafia leader,  Carmine Schiavone, declared that this area is completely filled with industrial and toxic waste. According to his declaration, this area is one of the most polluted places in the western world nowadays. We found the images striking and haunting and makes us rethink about that old “reduce, reuse, recycle”. Which of these environmental campaigns is your favorite? Which project did you find the least moving and inspirational? Why is that so? Please feel free to kindly leave a comment below.

Be the first to know. Get Exclusive News and Savings!